10 Animals They Should Be Brought Back To Life

More than one million species are threatened with extinction, but hope isn’t lost for nature. There are still many conservation success stories to be celebrated.

Over the last century, passionate and committed organisations and communities have pulled many animals and plants back from the brink. And this video Well talk about 10 animals they should be brought back to life.

So friends, this is the top 10 animals they should be brought back to life.Hope you all enjoy the video. Give a like, comment Below, and Don’t forget to subscribe.  British naturalists are on the prowl to prove that the species is still alive. 

Though the last known thylacine died at Hobart Zoo in Tasmania on Sept. 7, 1936, some believe the animal is alive and well in the island state’s remote northwestern region. 

Number 10. Tasmanian Tiger. 

The Tasmanian tiger was listed as extinct nearly 80 years ago, but now a team of British naturalists are on the prowl to prove that the species is still alive. 

Though the last known thylacine died at Hobart Zoo in Tasmania on Sept. 7, 1936, some believe the animal is alive and well in the island state’s remote northwestern region. 

Number 9. Dodo. 

For many of us, the dodo is the first creature that comes to mind when we think of extinct animals. In popular culture, it is the archetypal example of extinct species, to the point that “gone the way of the dodo” has become a common idiom referring to the extinction or obsolescence of almost anything. 

First discovered by modern humans around 1600, these unique-looking birds existed in limited areas free from natural predators.  

Number 8. California Golden Bear. 

The noble California golden bear, like the Japanese river otter, is held in high esteem as a symbol of the place that gave it its name.  

the bear depicted on the flag is based on Monarch, the last California golden bear held in captivity, whose taxidermied body remains preserved today at the Academy of Sciences at Golden Gate Park. The California golden bear also serves as the mascot of the UC Berkeley California Golden Bears and the UCLA Bruins. Of course, all this veneration didn’t keep the last living California golden bear from being shot and killed in 1922. 

Number 7. Japanese River Otter. 

In 2012, Japan’s Ministry of the Environment declared the Japanese river otter extinct. Once numbering in the millions, the population of river otters collapsed due to overhunting and habitat destruction by humans. The last time a Japanese river otter was seen was in 1979. Attempts to find more of the animals were conducted over the past few decades, but on Aug. 28, 2012, the Japanese government officially gave up hope. 

Number 6. Aurochs. 

The aurochs was the original cow, literally. the oldest evidence of aurochs known to man dates from about 2 million years ago during the Pleistocene, and they were first domesticated some 10,000 years ago.

The last living aurochs died in a Polish nature preserve in 1627. 

Number 5. Golden Toad. 

These beautiful amphibians only very recently disappeared from Earth. In fact, golden toads were first discovered less than 50 years ago, when herpetologist Jay Savage found them in 1966.  

In the 20 years following their discovery, approximately 1,500 golden toads were observed.  

Number 4. Blue Buck. 

Here’s an example of an animal whose extinction we can’t really blame on ourselves, because they were already quite rare by the time humankind found them. 

first discovered in the 1600s at the southern tip of Africa, Evidence suggests their numbers first dropped dramatically some 2,000-3,000 years ago due to natural climate change affecting the landscape and the bluebucks’ food sources. 

Number 3. Haast’s Eagle. 

The great Haast’s eagle, named for the man who first classified the species in 1870, is the largest eagle known to have ever existed on Earth. 

Yet all that happy hunting and eating was still enough to drive the moa to extinction by 1400.  

the Haast’s eagles weren’t so lucky. With no more food, they likewise became extinct almost immediately. 

Number 2. Laughing Owl. 

Here a sub-theme emerges as we look at yet another extinct bird native to New Zealand. 

A group of American tourists were visiting New Zealand in the 1980s when, far from civilization, they were frightened by the sound of cackling laughter. 

The story may be hard to prove, but we remain cautiously optimistic that humans will be terrified by the screech of laughing owls again someday. 

Number 1. Pyranean Ibex. 

Here’s another extinct animal whose fate may not be sealed. 

their numbers dwindled to fewer than 100 by the 20th century. The last Pyrenean ibex died in 2000, and then the animal was extinct. 

After several years of failed attempts, a cloned Pyrenean ibex was born to a mountain-goat surrogate mother in 2009.  

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